Iran: Three Hand Amputations, Four Hangings Carried Out in Qom

Medieval and barbaric: Judicial amputation carried out in public, Iran.
NCRI - The Iranian regime's deputy prosecutor in the city of Qom, announced that the hands of three person accused of theft were amputated and at the same time four others accused of drug related crimes were executed in Qom central prison.

According to Iranian regime's radio and television news agency on September 21, deputy prosecutor called Younes Davoudi officially announced the above mentioned punishments.

It is noteworthy than in the month of June, two young men in Tehran accused of theft were sentenced by the 11th Branch of Tehran Province criminal court to have their fingers amputated.

“I was forced to resort to stealing to come up with money for my wife’s chemotherapy,” one of the accused said.

The defendants are Taghi, 30, and Parviz, 31, by their first names.

The state-run Rokna news agency interviewed one of the defendants whose wife is suffering from cancer:

Q: How many counts do you have?

A: Four counts of theft

Q: Why did you steal?

A: I didn’t have any money to pay for my wife’s chemotherapy while she suffers from cancer. Of course, I don’t know if she’s still alive or not.

Q: Do you have a child?

A: Yeah, two daughters.

Q: Why didn’t you try to find work and not steal?

A: I was wrong

Q: What will you do if they amputate your hands?

A: I don’t know, and I truly regret it. I tried my best to gain their consent, but I’m alone, in prison and no one can help me.

Q: Where is your family now?

A: I don’t know. I’m worried about my wife but they have all forgotten me.

Q: Where did you place what you stole?

A: We sold it to a guy, and they are after him now. He gave us very little money.

Source: NCRI, September 22, 2017


⚑ | Report an error, an omission, a typo; suggest a story or a new angle to an existing story; submit a piece, a comment; recommend a resource; contact the webmaster, contact us: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com.


Opposed to Capital Punishment? Help us keep this blog up and running! DONATE!



"One is absolutely sickened, not by the crimes that the wicked have committed,
but by the punishments that the good have inflicted." -- Oscar Wilde


from Death Penalty News http://ift.tt/2wLlODN
| September 22, 2017 |

Iran: Three executions carried out, two in front of large crowds

Parsabad public execution, Iran, 20 SEPT 2017
A man was hanged in public as a large crowd of people, including children, watched.

Iran Human Rights (SEPT 21 2017): A man by the name of Ismael Rangerz was hanged in public in the city of Parsabad (Ardabil province) on murder and rape charges.

According to various state-run news agencies, the public execution was carried out on Wednesday September 20 in front of a large crowd of people, including children.

The judicial process for the prisoner lasted for a total of three months before his execution was carried out. 

Iran Human Rights is concerned that Ismael Rangers did not receive a fair trial.

The research of Iran Human Rights shows 33 people were hanged in public in Iran in 2016 and an audience of hundreds of people, including children, were present for most of these hangings. 

Human rights activists and informed members of civil society have always severely criticized this issue.


Parsabad public execution, Iran, 20 SEPT 2017


An unidentified man was hanged in public on murder charges

Golestan public hanging, Iran, 20 SEPT 2017
Iran Human Rights (SEPT 21 2017): An unidentified prisoner was reportedly hanged in public on the charge of murder of a police officer. 

The public execution was carried out on Wednesday September 20 in the province of Golestan.

According to the state-run news agency, Tasnim, the prisoner was arrested and sentenced to death last year. 

"This individual was sentenced to death on the charges of extortion, armed shooting and creating a state of fear and terror in society. He had wounded five police officers, and one of these officers, whose name is Hussein Deilam Katouli, was killed," says the head of the Judiciary in Golestan. 

The prisoner's name was not released in any of the state-run news reports.

The research of Iran Human Rights shows 33 people were hanged in public in Iran in 2016 and an audience of hundreds of people, including children, were present for most of these hangings. Human rights activists and informed members of civil society have always severely criticized this issue.


A man and a woman were executed in two different Iranian prisons on murder charges


Iran Human Rights (SEPT 21 2017): A man was reportedly hanged at Mashhad Central Prison on murder charges, and a woman was reportedly hanged at Zanjan Central Prison on murder charges.

According to the state-run news agency, Khorassan News, the prisoner at Mashhad Central Prison, was executed on the morning of Monday September 18. 

The report did not identify the name of the prisoner, but identified his age as 29.

According to the state-run news agency, Mehr News, the execution at Zanjan Central Prison was carried out on Tuesday September 19. 

The woman was identified only by the initials.

Source: Iran Human Rights, September 21, 2017


⚑ | Report an error, an omission, a typo; suggest a story or a new angle to an existing story; submit a piece, a comment; recommend a resource; contact the webmaster, contact us: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com.


Opposed to Capital Punishment? Help us keep this blog up and running! DONATE!



"One is absolutely sickened, not by the crimes that the wicked have committed,
but by the punishments that the good have inflicted." -- Oscar Wilde


from Death Penalty News http://ift.tt/2xyT6KH
| September 22, 2017 |

Two Myanmar migrants make final appeal in Koh Tao murder case

Zaw Lin (right) and Wai Phyo (left) being escorted by a Thai police officer.
Thailand's Supreme Court accepted the final appeal by Thai lawyers representing Myanmar migrants Win Zaw Tun and Zaw Linn, who have been sentenced to death for the murder of British tourists Hannah Witheridge and David Miller on Koh Tao island in Thailand.

The final appeal, which is 319 pages long, was submitted to the court on August 21 by the Thailand Lawyers Council.

In its appeal, the council pointed to evidence that Win and Zaw had been denied justice and fairness throughout the case and are innocent despite the death sentence, according to Myanmar embassy special representative U Aung Myo Thant, who is also a lawyer working on the case with the council.

He said they pointed out that Thai police violated standard police procedure in the collection of DNA evidence and phone records. The council said the police failed to carry out proper procedures in searching for DNA evidence, and they forced the two migrants to admit to the murder.

“We have submitted throughout this whole process that the evidence does not support the death sentence and the two Myanmar men are innocent,” U Aung Myo Thant said on Monday.

Win and Zaw have been imprisoned for three years since the murders of the two British backpackers on September 15, 2014. They were found guilty of seven charges – including the murder of Miller, the rape and murder of Witheridge and of illegally living in Thailand – and sentenced to death in December 2015 in a Thai court on Koh Samui island.

U Aung Myo Thant said the council pointed out the evidence was not strong enough to support the death sentence.

The National Crime Agency of the United Kingdom admitted to a court in London in August that they illegally gave phone records to the Thai police that helped to convict the two Myanmar migrants.

He said the evidence supplied by the UK agency and submitted by the prosecution can be considered illegal.

U Aung Myo Thant cited the example of a court ruling on a murder case six years ago in Thailand. In that case, a suspect who was sentenced to death by a court had the sentence overturned by the Supreme Court because the evidence was not strong enough, even though the suspect admitted to the murder.

“Thailand has only one law for its citizens as well as foreigners, so I believe our two migrants can escape the death sentence because there is not enough evidence of murder,” he said.

He said he knows there are good prospects for a reprieve for the two migrants because he has attended all the hearings in the case and knows the case thoroughly.

The lawyers council submitted appeals to overturn the death sentence twice before, but the appeals were denied by lower courts.

The council and Myanmar officials hope to hear a ruling on the final appeal to the Supreme Court within six months.

U Aung Myo Thant said they will appeal again to the Thai royal government if the Supreme Court rejects their final appeal.

U Aung Kyaw, president of the Thailand-based Migrant Workers Rights Network, which has been helping the council on the case, also urged the Thai government to rule in favour of the two Myanmar men.

Myanmar’ special representative U Htoo Chit, executive director of the Thailand-based Foundation for Education, also said the NCA’s admission of illegally sharing evidence could affect the case and require that it be reinvestigated.

Migrant activist Ko Shwe Tun Aye, chair of the Phuket-based Migrant Workers Network, which is helping on the final appeal, also hoped for a good outcome for the two men.

Myanmar’s chief of defence and president of parliament have also appealed to the Thai government for justice and fairness for the two migrants.

Myanmar nationals have held protests and asked for justice for the two Myanmar migrants. Famous Myanmar psychic Ee Ti, who died recently, also asked the Thai royal family for justice on behalf of the two Myanmar migrants.

Source: Myanmar Times, September 22, 2017


⚑ | Report an error, an omission, a typo; suggest a story or a new angle to an existing story; submit a piece, a comment; recommend a resource; contact the webmaster, contact us: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com.


Opposed to Capital Punishment? Help us keep this blog up and running! DONATE!



"One is absolutely sickened, not by the crimes that the wicked have committed,
but by the punishments that the good have inflicted." -- Oscar Wilde


from Death Penalty News http://ift.tt/2jRfFor
| September 22, 2017 |

Malaysia: ‘Death penalty not an option’ in school fire that killed 21 students

The fire at the Darul Quran Ittifaqiyah school resulted in the deaths of 21 students and two teachers.
A fire at the Darul Quran Ittifaqiyah school resulted in the deaths of 21 students and two teachers

PETALING JAYA: The seven youths held over the tahfiz fire last Thursday cannot face the death penalty as they are underage, said Minister in the Prime Minister’s Department Datuk Seri Azalina Othman Said.

Responding to the chorus of calls from parents of the victims and the public for the youths to be charged as adults and given the death penalty, the de-facto Law Minister said the teenagers would be tried in accordance with laws such as Section 97(1) of the Child Act 2001.

She said even if they were found guilty of murder, their punishments would be under Section 91(1) of the Act which include whipping, fines or detention at an approved school.

Inspector-General of Police Tan Sri Mohamad Fuzi Harun also said that the parents of the youths would not be charged as they had nothing to do with the case.

Azalina said the incident should be used as a lesson for all parties, especially parents, in the fight against crime involving children.

“I urge all parties to stop specula­ting and give space to the authorities to complete the investigation,” she said.

The early morning fire at the Darul Quran Ittifaqiyah school resulted in the deaths of 21 students and two teachers.

In a related development, Fire and Rescue Department director-general Datuk Wan Mohd Nor Ibrahim said the entrance at the dormitory in which 21 students and two teachers were burned to death, had been doused with petrol.

He said traces of petrol were found on the dorm’s door and outer wall, as well as on a towel rack and a shoe rack located outside the room’s door.

He said two gas cylinders with their valves removed were placed in front of the door, and Liquid Petroleum Gas was deliberately released from the cylinders, causing the fire to spread fast.

“The fire started at the main entrance of the dormitory, which is located at the third level of the school. This is based on the statements taken from witnesses and victims that survived.

“We also found spalling on the wall near the dormitory door, mass loss on the door, ceiling, cupboard and a shoe rack.

“Clean burn marks on the wall surrounding the dormitory entrance strengthens the evidence that the fire started at the door.

“Four dogs from our K9 Unit found seven traces in front of the dormitory, and these samples were found to contain a flammable liquid residue, which is petrol,” he told a press conference in Putrajaya yesterday.

Wan Mohd Nor said the official cause of the incident is classified as incendiary fire.

One of the teenagers arrested to help police in their investigations into the fire was brought to the tahfiz at about 11.50am yesterday.

He was escorted to the rear fence of the tahfiz and was taken away an hour later.

Source: The Star, September 22, 2017


⚑ | Report an error, an omission, a typo; suggest a story or a new angle to an existing story; submit a piece, a comment; recommend a resource; contact the webmaster, contact us: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com.


Opposed to Capital Punishment? Help us keep this blog up and running! DONATE!



"One is absolutely sickened, not by the crimes that the wicked have committed,
but by the punishments that the good have inflicted." -- Oscar Wilde


from Death Penalty News http://ift.tt/2hnpeag
| September 22, 2017 |

Gambia: President Barrow Signs Abolition Of Death Penalty Treaty

 President Adama Barrow
(JollofNews) – A few hours after delivering his maiden speech at the United Nations’ General Assembly, New York, President Adama Barrow of the Gambia has signed a treaty for the abolition of the death penalty as part of the Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights.

The president also signed the treaty on the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of their Families, the International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance, the United Nations Convention on Transparency in Treaty-Based Investor-State Arbitration and the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

“By signing of the treaties, the New Gambia continues to promote democracy and show the commitment of the state to protect lives of political activists,” a communique from the president’s office stated.

“This will remove fear and promote rule of law for citizens to express their civil and political rights. The signing is a commitment of member states of the United Nations to prohibit execution and totally abolish the death penalty.”

The Gambia is one of the countries with high migration rate but also receives immigrants from other African countries, thus the importance of protecting the dignity of all migrants. It agrees to protect the human rights of migrant workers and families.

During regime of former President Yahya Jammeh, Gambians were subjected to forced disappearance.

The president’s office said it is commendable for the Gambia to agree to prevent forced disappearance defined in international law not only at home but throughout the UN member states.

It added: “Setting international rules for investor-state arbitration is strategic as the world is increasingly dependent on investment for development of communities. Consent to apply the sets of rules on transparency in treaty-based Investor-State Arbitration will provide mechanism for recording such agreement and shall come into force as of 18th October 2017. It intends to minimise criminal acts and economic exploitation.

“The Gambia intends to prevent mass destruction of human life and property to promote peaceful co-existence in the world. The signing of the treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, or the Nuclear Weapon Ban Treaty will strengthen that commitment.

“The Gambia will now work to move from signing, to ratification and domestication of the signed treaties, to make them effectively in the country.”

Meanwhile, in separate engagements, President Barrow continued to hold meetings and network with his colleagues and investors.

On Wednesday morning, along with other invited heads of states, President Barrow attended a business meeting with Bloomberg at the Plaza Hotel in New York.

He also held a private meeting with the prime minister of Belgium and the chief prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC), Fatou Bensouda.

During the meeting, Ms Bensouda gave an overview of her organisation’s work and called for support from African countries to understand the Rome Statues.

Source: JollofNews, September 21, 2017


⚑ | Report an error, an omission, a typo; suggest a story or a new angle to an existing story; submit a piece, a comment; recommend a resource; contact the webmaster, contact us: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com.


Opposed to Capital Punishment? Help us keep this blog up and running! DONATE!



"One is absolutely sickened, not by the crimes that the wicked have committed,
but by the punishments that the good have inflicted." -- Oscar Wilde


from Death Penalty News http://ift.tt/2hl6hIZ
| September 22, 2017 |

When racism lurks in the heart of a death penalty juror, does a killer deserve to live?

Jury box
“Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men?” This single, sinister question, asked over a sepulchral-sounding musical score, was rhetorical; for after a dramatic pause and a malevolent cackle, the narrator smugly informed the audience: “The Shadow knows.”

And so it was with this somber admonition on September 26, 1937, that the gritty, crime-fighting character dubbed “The Shadow,” whose exploits had previously been limited to pulp fiction magazines, burst into American consciousness with his own radio program. The uber-successful first episode called “The Death House Rescue” would lead to a run of 664 more installments over 18 seasons.

Exactly 80 years later another story about a scheduled execution, this time one that is all too real, is playing out; but, unlike that first episode of “The Shadow,” there is little chance of a tidy and fair resolution (much less “a death house rescue”). Indeed, absent an unlikely intervention, the state of Georgia will execute death row inmate Keith Tharpe by lethal injection on September 26, 2017.

Also, unlike the condemned man in “The Shadow’s” fictional “Death House Rescue,” no one is arguing that Tharpe is innocent. Nevertheless, Tharpe’s attorneys argue he shouldn’t be put to death because, as has been widely reported, after Tharpe’s conviction and death sentence, Tharpe’s lawyers secured a prejudice-laden sworn affidavit from a now-deceased juror by the name of Barney Gattie.

Despite having affirmed under oath during jury selection that he could be fair and impartial — as all jurors in a criminal case must — Gattie swore in his affidavit, that there are two kinds of black people in the world: “good black folks” and “ni**ers.” Gattie attested that the victim’s family in Tharpe’s case belonged to this first group of black people whereas Tharpe belonged to the latter, and further, that this was precisely the warped logic he used to sentence Tharpe to death. Finally, as if these despicable admissions weren’t sufficiently outrageous — and reason enough to commute Tharpe’s death sentence to life without the possibility of parole, because it was so odiously and impermissibly tainted by race — Gattie’s affidavit abominably asserts: “After studying the Bible, I have wondered if black people even have souls.”

Huge problem, right? Red flags and alarm bells are sounding all over, aren’t they? Obviously a clear moral imperative exists to call off this 21st century style lynching? Nope. At least, not yet. And, given our increasingly prosecution-leaning, capital punishment-enabling Supreme Court, maybe not at all.

You see, according to asinine arguments advanced by blood-thirsty prosecutors — which thus far both state and federal courts have adopted — Gattie’s vile and hateful comments were merely “racially insensitive offhand remarks.” To fully wrap your mind around this deplorable position, all you have to do is take a break from reality and cue your favorite off-color, cringe-worthy soliloquy by Archie Bunker. (You remember that affable but avowedly racist, anti-Semitic television character from the ‘70s, don’t you?).

Georgia prosecutors are basically arguing that, just like Archie Bunker, Gattie wasn’t really such a bad guy, was he? If the bigoted but big-hearted Archie Bunker were a real person we would all, each and every one of us, surely trust him to be a fair and impartial juror . . . wouldn’t we? Especially in the case of a black man on trial for his life?

Keith TharpeMoreover, Georgia prosecutors are insisting Tharpe’s death sentence remains kosher because, after the revolting details of his affidavit were revealed, Gattie subsequently tried to explain it all away by testifying he was drunk. Specifically, Gattie claimed he was inebriated — both on the day he initially spoke to Tharpe’s defense team — and then, again, on the day he reviewed his racially tinged affidavit and signed it. Thus, not unlike The Shadow’s power to “cloud men’s minds,” prosecutors in Georgia maintain as the actor/producer Mel Gibson (infamously) once did, that it was only because Gattie was wasted that he made his racially repugnant statements.

This is a tough sell — tougher even than that whole ridiculous Archie Bunker bit — because as the saying goes, “a drunken man’s words are a sober man’s thoughts” (or alternatively, as was commonly said in Latin many hundreds of years ago, “in vino, veritas“). Indeed, as Belisa Vranich, a clinical psychologist who specializes in alcohol addiction told ABC News at the time of Gibson’s highly publicized highway rant: “People dredge up feelings and sentiments from somewhere deep in their brains, so what one says or does certainly reflects what’s going on deep down. Alcohol can most definitely act as a truth serum — something that allows people to say what is truly on their mind.”

And it is with that truism in mind, one that anyone who has ever been drunk before already knows, that we arrive full circle to the question that the Supreme Court of the United States will likely soon be forced to consider about the pending execution of Keith Tharpe: What evil lurked in the heart of Barney Gattie? The answer, of course, is hatred — and racism — as rank and real as it is repulsive. And you don’t need to be The Shadow or even a Supreme Court justice to know that.

Source: The Telegraph, Opinion, Stephen Cooper, September 21, 2017. Stephen Cooper is a former D.C. public defender who worked as an assistant federal public defender in Alabama between 2012 and 2015. He has contributed to numerous magazines and newspapers in the United States and overseas. He writes full-time and lives in Woodland Hills, California. Follow him on Twitter at @SteveCooperEsq


⚑ | Report an error, an omission, a typo; suggest a story or a new angle to an existing story; submit a piece, a comment; recommend a resource; contact the webmaster, contact us: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com.


Opposed to Capital Punishment? Help us keep this blog up and running! DONATE!



"One is absolutely sickened, not by the crimes that the wicked have committed,
but by the punishments that the good have inflicted." -- Oscar Wilde


from Death Penalty News http://ift.tt/2xUQHdY
| September 21, 2017 |

Arkansas judge: State must disclose execution drug details

Midazolam
Arkansas' intent to shield much of its execution procedure from public view took another hit Tuesday when a 2nd judge ruled that the state's prison system must disclose labels that will identify the manufacturer of a lethal injection drug.

Pulaski County Circuit Judge Mackie Pierce told the Arkansas Department of Correction to give lawyer Steven Shults unredacted package inserts for recently acquired midazolam by Sept. 28. He said Arkansas' legislators had an opportunity to grant pharmaceutical companies secrecy in a 2015 execution law, but didn't.

"They know what manufacturers are," Pierce said. "They knew what the issues were. They left out a key word not once, but twice and maybe 3 times."

In April, Shults won a similar case concerning information about potassium chloride, another execution drug. The case is being appealed to the state Supreme Court, and Arkansas also plans to appeal Pierce's ruling.

As its previous midazolam supply approached its expiration date in April, Arkansas scheduled 8 executions and carried out 4. They were the state's 1st executions after a nearly 12-year delay caused, in part, by drug manufacturers saying they didn't want their life-saving products used to take inmates' lives. Arkansas and other states in turn made many of their death penalty procedures secret, believing that firms and individuals involved in executions might be targeted by protests if their assistance was noted - and that the privacy might make some willing to help.

In court papers filed ahead of Tuesday's hearing, Shults' lawyer said Arkansas has not had trouble finding enough drugs to execute 2 more inmates. 1 execution is set for Nov. 9.

"Despite using its expiring supply of midazolam as a reason to schedule a record eight executions in 11 days in April of this year, ADC miraculously found a supplier to sell it 40 more vials for $250.00 cash," lawyer Alec Gaines wrote. "It seems evident that ADC is overplaying the difficulty involved in obtaining its supply of execution drugs."

The Associated Press used product labels in 2015 to identify which drugs Arkansas would use in executions against their makers' will. Assistant Attorney General Jennifer Merritt told Pierce on Tuesday that some of the manufacturers had objected to the state's use of their drugs and that the state hoped to stop future disclosures.

She also said the "legislative intent" was to extend secrecy to manufacturers, but that the law "could have been more artfully crafted."

Arkansas recently acquired enough of the sedative midazolam to conduct 2 executions, with Jack Greene set to die in 7 weeks. Shults previously went to court and won access to the package inserts for potassium chloride, an execution drug that stops the inmates' hearts.

Arkansas' 3rd execution drug is vecuronium bromide, which stops the inmates' lungs.

Source: swtimes.com, Sept. 20, 2017


⚑ | Report an error, an omission, a typo; suggest a story or a new angle to an existing story; submit a piece, a comment; recommend a resource; contact the webmaster, contact us: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com.


Opposed to Capital Punishment? Help us keep this blog up and running! DONATE!



"One is absolutely sickened, not by the crimes that the wicked have committed,
but by the punishments that the good have inflicted." -- Oscar Wilde


from Death Penalty News http://ift.tt/2fdcCC4
| September 21, 2017 |

Judge: Inmate drug reaction wasn't enough to stop Ohio execution

Execution Chamber Phones
Descriptions of the repeated rising and falling of an inmate's stomach weren't enough to stop his execution under current legal precedent governing lethal injection in Ohio, a federal judge said in explaining his decision not to intervene.

It was also likely too late to act by the time attorneys for inmate Gary Otte reached him by phone during the execution on Sept. 13, Judge Michael Merz said in a ruling on Saturday.

The description of Otte's reaction to the 1st execution drug was not enough to show he "was experiencing unconstitutionally severe pain," the judge said in a 5-page ruling.

Otte, 45, was put to death for the 1992 murders of 2 people during robberies over 2 days in suburban Cleveland.

After the 1st drug was administered - the sedative midazolam - Otte's stomach rose and fell repeatedly over the next couple of minutes. It was similar to the rising and falling of inmates' stomachs and chests seen in past executions using a different drug, though Otte's movement appeared to go on longer.

Carol Wright, a federal public defender representing Otte, also said she saw tears on his face and he was clenching his hands, which indicated to her he was suffering.

When Otte's stomach began to rise and fall, Wright tried to leave the witness room in the death house at the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility to call another attorney in a different part of the prison.

Wright said execution policy should have allowed her to leave right away. But a spokeswoman for the state's prison system said once Wright's identity and intentions were confirmed, she was allowed out.

Wright "is reporting that there were signs that Mr. Otte was conscious, crying, clenching of the hands, heaving at the stomach," Allen Bohnert, another federal public defender, told Merz by phone at 10:48 a.m. that morning, according to a transcript of his call to the judge. The execution began at 10:40 a.m.

After listening to the attorneys' descriptions of the execution, Merz declined to stop the procedure.

The descriptions weren't enough to override an appeals court ruling this past summer stating that the likelihood of pain after the injection of the sedative midazolam didn't violate the constitution, Merz said in the Sept. 16 ruling.

Immediately after the execution, Wright said attorneys will continue to challenge the use of midazolam. They said even at a massive dose of 500 milligrams it won't render inmates so deeply unconscious that they won't feel pain from the two subsequent drugs, which paralyze inmates and stop their hearts.

The next execution is Nov. 15, when Ohio plans to put Alva Campbell to death for carjacking and killing 18-year-old Charles Dials in 1997.

Source: The Republic, September 21, 2017


⚑ | Report an error, an omission, a typo; suggest a story or a new angle to an existing story; submit a piece, a comment; recommend a resource; contact the webmaster, contact us: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com.


Opposed to Capital Punishment? Help us keep this blog up and running! DONATE!



"One is absolutely sickened, not by the crimes that the wicked have committed,
but by the punishments that the good have inflicted." -- Oscar Wilde


from Death Penalty News http://ift.tt/2fCNTrp
| September 21, 2017 |

India: PIL asks Supreme Court abolish hanging as death penalty, bring in shooting or lethal injection

Gallows
A petition in the Supreme Court has asked the court to do away with the practice of hanging death row convicts. The petition suggests that methods such as shooting or lethal injection be used instead.

The dormant debate on doing away with the practice of hanging death row convicts has revived momentum thanks to a Public Interest Litigation (PIL) filed in the Supreme Court. 

Petitioner Rishi Malhotra, a Supreme Court advocate, has sought abolition of the present practice of hanging and suggested alternative methods such as intravenous lethal injection or shooting.

Holding that hanging involved prolonged pain and suffering compared to the other two suggested procedures, Malhotra quoted earlier judgments of the Supreme Court and recommendations of the Law Commission to bolster his case.

The petition said in Gian Kaur vs State of Punjab (1996), the Supreme Court had held that "the right to life, including the right to live with human dignity, would mean the existence of such a right up to the end of natural life. This also includes the right to a dignified life up to the point of death, including a dignified procedure of death. In other words, this may include the right of a dying man to also die with dignity when his life is ebbing out."

Drawing a comparison, the petition said while in hanging the entire execution process takes more than 40 minutes to declare a prisoner to be dead, the shooting process involves not more than a few minutes. In case of intravenous lethal injection, it's all over in 5 minutes.

Malhotra said the Law Commission's view was that developed as well as developing countries have replaced the execution by hanging with intravenous lethal injection or shooting, "which is most acceptable and humane method of executing death sentence involving less pain and suffering to a condemned prisoner".

EARLIER PRECEDENTS


Drawing attention to another SC judgment, Deena vs Union of India, Malhotra said in that case it was said the act of execution should be as quick and as simple as possible and free from anything that unnecessarily sharpens the poignancy of the prisoner's apprehension.

"The act of the execution should produce immediate unconsciousness passing quickly into the death, should be decent and should not involve mutilation," the SC had said.

Malhotra argued that the law panel in 1967 in its 35th Report had also noted the fact that most of the countries has either adopted electrocution, firing squad or gas chamber as a substitute for hanging.

He wants the Supreme Court to declare Section 354(5) of Criminal Procedure, which says "when any person is sentenced to death, the sentence shall direct that he be hanged by the neck till he is dead", declared violative of the right to life guaranteed by the Constitution.

He also wants that the right to die by a dignified procedure of death should be declared a fundamental right.

"Shooting and injecting with lethal poison necessarily involves lesser agony compared to hanging, which involves a torturous procedure of weighing the convict, measuring the height, etc. in order to determine the length of the drop," Malhotra said.

The lawyer argues that the execution as contemplated under Section 354(5) of CrPC (hung by the neck till the person is dead) is not only barbaric, inhuman and cruel, but also against resolutions adopted by the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) that had categorically resolved that "where Capital punishment occurs, it shall be carried out so as to inflict minimum possible suffering".

Source: India Today, September 21, 2017


⚑ | Report an error, an omission, a typo; suggest a story or a new angle to an existing story; submit a piece, a comment; recommend a resource; contact the webmaster, contact us: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com.


Opposed to Capital Punishment? Help us keep this blog up and running! DONATE!



"One is absolutely sickened, not by the crimes that the wicked have committed,
but by the punishments that the good have inflicted." -- Oscar Wilde


from Death Penalty News http://ift.tt/2jMVdFb
| September 21, 2017 |
Back to Top